Probate & Estate Administration

Sorting out the estate of a friend or family member who has died can be highly complicated, adding extra stress at what is already an emotional time. Our solicitors can step in to help take you through the necessary procedures, allowing you to move on with the grieving process without having to worry about getting to grips with all the legal ins and outs of managing an estate. We will work with you to make sure you understand exactly what is required, so you can feel confident about the process.

Being an executor

If you have been named an executor of a will you will need to apply for a “grant of representation” (also known as a “grant of probate”). This gives you the legal right to administer the deceased’s estate and will act as proof of this when dealing with the deceased’s bank and other institutions. A grant of representation may not always be necessary, depending on the type of assets the deceased owned and the rules of whichever bank or building society they had accounts with. This is something on which we can provide guidance.

It is possible that the person making the will may have named you as one of several executors, meaning you would usually have to work with the other named executors to administer the estate. Alternatively, your loved one may not have left a will, they may have failed to name an executor, or the named executor/s may be unable or unwilling to perform the role. If this happens, you may need to apply for a grant of representation to allow you to take control of dealing with the deceased’s assets.

All of these potential scenarios can be difficult and time consuming to navigate. It is important to understand, once you have taken on the role of executor, you become personally responsible to the beneficiaries of the will for any losses that might occur. Using a solicitor to advise you can not only makes your life easier, but will also allow you the peace of mind that things are being handled in the correct way, protecting yourself and the beneficiaries while ensuring the deceased’s instructions are carried out.

Estate Administration

As an executor, you are responsible for establishing the exact assets the deceased owned (both in the UK and worldwide if applicable) and any debts they might have had outstanding, such as a mortgage or unpaid utility bills. Our experienced team of probate lawyers can manage this process for you, including contacting the deceased’s bank and other institutions, notifying beneficiaries of the estate, providing advice about any complex issues, such as trusts or the effect of intestacies and helping you deal with any tax consequences for the estate.

We can also take charge of collecting the deceased’s assets, paying their debts and distributing their estate to those named in the will. In instances where there is no will (known as “intestacy”), we can advise you on how to proceed, ensuring that you act in accordance with the relevant rules.   

Inheritance Tax

One of the most important issues to get right is any inheritance tax payable on the estate. If inheritance tax is owed, this must be paid either in full or by instalments before a grant of administration will be issued allowing you to move forward with the rest of the process. There may also be implications for the beneficiaries’ income tax, so this also needs to be considered. Our team have decades of experience dealing with tax issues, so will be happy to guide you through the relevant issues.   

 

Our team of probate solicitors in Bristol understand that dealing with the affairs of a deceased loved one can be both stressful and upsetting. We combine a sensitive approach with the knowledge and experience gained from years of helping people just like you through this difficult process.

To find out more, or to book an appointment, call 0117 962 1205 and ask for a member of our probate team. Alternatively, you can use our online contact form to send us a message and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

ARTICLES


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More to Administering an Estate than Obtaining a Grant of Probate

Brenda Smyth of AMD Solicitors considers the tax implications when dealing with the administration of an estate

Andrew Jack, Solicitor Read our story

Dangers of a homemade will

Andrew Jack of AMD Solicitors considers the dangers of homemade wills

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AMD's Probate Talks - A summary of the main issues

Last month, AMD Solicitors hosted two probate talks to outline current issues in Private Client Law. The talks are held to inform members of the public about the changing law and there are opportunities to ask questions. We had an excellent turn out last month presenting to 30 people at the Trinity-Henleaze United Reformed Church.

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Successful private client talks

Andrew Jack and Florence Pearce, two of our experienced private client Solicitors, recently gave talks at both the Tyndale Baptist Church in Clifton and the Trinity Henleaze URC Church in Henleaze on Inheritance Tax, Lasting Powers of Attorney, wills, and related matters.

Andrew Jack, Solicitor Read our story

Successful talk to St Andrews Ladies Club

On 19 April our Andrew Jack spoke to the members of St Andrews Ladies Club in Avonmouth.  He had been invited along to speak to them on the subject of Wills, Powers of Attorney and Probate after a member of the club had previously attended a public talk run in Shirehampton and was impressed with how Andrew presented.

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Inheritance and the changing family

While many of the families who seek our advice on planning for inheritance remain a traditional structure, there are increasing numbers of more complicated families. There are often challenging issues to resolve when advising on succession planning for modern-day families.

Andrew Jack, Solicitor Read our story

DIY Probate pitfalls and how to avoid them

Andrew Jack, one of our Probate and Wills Specialists offers some tips on avoiding DIY probate pitfalls.

Claire+Nelson+Articles Read our story

The new law of Inheritance Progress, but not enough

The law of inheritance in England and Wales has changed significantly with effect from 1 October 2014 as the “Inheritance and Trustees’ Powers Act 2014” comes into force. The changes are in the writer’s view generally for the good, though much more could have been done to update and improve the current rules.

Alison Articles Read our story

My Partner Died Without a Will, Am I Entitled to Their Estate?

If you are not married you do not automatically inherit your partner’s Estate if they die without having made a Will. However, if you have lived with your partner for two years or more and can show you were wholly or partially financially dependent on them, you can expect reasonable financial provision from their Estate for your maintenance.

Alison Articles Read our story

Contesting a Will – Do I have a Case?

If you have been written out of a will or do not feel you have been fairly represented and suspect some wrong doing, you may be able to contest the legal validity of the will. In addition to fraud and forgery there are two circumstances that can lead to a will being invalid: where there was undue influence by a third party on the person who made the will, or that person was lacking in testamentary capacity at the time of making their will - for example if they lacked mental capacity due to illness.

Andrew Jack, Solicitor Read our story

What Do I Need To Know Before Writing My Will?

Andrew Jack of AMD Solicitors offers important information for anyone about to undertake the task of writing their will, and explains why it is important to seek legal advice before doing so.

Shelley Faulkner, Solicitor at AMD Solicitors, Bristol Read our story

More haste, less speed - Why does probate take so long?

By Shelley Faulkner, solicitor with AMD Solicitors.

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The Forgotten Tax

By Florence Pearce, Specialist Wills, Trusts and Probate Solicitor with AMD Solicitors.